Latest from Homeland Security on my cock

Yes, it’s true, I’ve been in conversation with Homeland Security about how to limit the hubbub around my packing cock the next time I go through SFO’s security checkpoint.

For the original story of how I got special attention from security, click here, with a previous update here.

Since I’ll be flying out of that airport early next week, I thought it’d be good to ask for an update from my buddy, we’ll call him Mister A.  I explained that I hadn’t heard from him in awhile and was still interested in how I might communicate with agents in order to facilitate a better experience for all involved.  I asked if there were specific terms or phrases I could use to explain why I had a foreign object in my pants.  My desire is to communicate clearly, not to offend.

Mister A didn’t respond to that question directly, rather he assured me that

“You will not encounter any difficulties on your trip through SFO.”

All I needed to do was provide flight information on my departure, and he’d notify a supervisor who would ensure a smooth transfer through the checkpoint.  Now, that’s cool and all, though it does have a kind of weird “Big Brother is watching out for you”, feel.  I also wonder if this is how it’s going to be from now on.  Will I always have to notify Mister A of my travel plans to ensure I’m not given undue attention?  What about the next guy, the one who packs and hasn’t thought about the implications with regard to airport security?

My response thanked A for his assistance but also posed this question:

“Thanks again for your help.  In the larger picture, if you were to give advice to other individuals who utilize prosthetics as I do, what would it be?”

Because that’s the real point:  how are they going to, on a continuing basis, deal with people who pack in a respectful and communicative way?  So far it looks like a global solution hasn’t been determined yet.  Mister A is going to make sure that I get through the checkpoint, but he’s made no assurances about how other individuals will be dealt with.

Considering last weekend was Pride weekend in San Francisco, I’m wondering if anyone else had issues at the checkpoints because of packing.  Surely there were butches and trans guys packing through the airport.  If I’m the only one talking to Homeland Security and San Francisco International Customer Service about this stuff, it’s not going to make a huge impression.  If you had an experience (good or bad) with regard to packing through a checkpoint, or if you know someone who did, I’d love to hear from you.

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3 Responses to Latest from Homeland Security on my cock

  1. Roxy says:

    I was honestly surprised that they’ve been so accommodating with you…I guess I cynically assumed they’d respond with the same “it’s your problem, not ours” that is epidemic in government.

    That being said, as happy as I am that you’ve been assured it won’t be a problem again, having to register your plans with Homeland Security for each flight, even if it were an option for everyone, is not an acceptable solution. Beyond the fact that many people wouldn’t know to talk to them first, security personnel who work in San Francisco really need to be educated better, and putting it on your shoulders is shirking that responsibility.

    I really do hope that your communications have opened their eyes to only one of many situations they did not consider when drafting security rules. Thank you for continuing the conversation both here and with Homeland Security, and for being that squeaky wheel that hopefully gets all the wheels oiled.

  2. Charles says:

    I’ve never had a problem packing in airports, especially in SFO. While I understand being cautious and wanting things to go smoothly, I think you are a bit overly concerned about things.

    I have flown around the east coast and the south with absolutely no problems or questions, and I am even more at ease when flying out of SFO.

    If I was ever asked about it I’d be upfront and say it was a prosthetic, etc. More people are worried about getting their T prescription safely on the plane than packing.

    I would not worry about calling them every time you fly; it’s really not a big deal at all. I can’t imagine the people at SFO ever giving you a problem.

    Charles, it’s awesome that you haven’t had an issues, but I did last January. I blogged about the whole thing here. It could be that you haven’t gone through the Biometric scanners yet, I believe they only have them at the International checkpoint, which is the checkpoint I go through to catch Virgin America flights.

    So, no, this contact and caution and wariness doesn’t come out of thin air, in fact, until that incident in January, I didn’t give my packing cock a second thought as I approached security.

  3. raechel says:

    Hello! I’m so happy I stumbled upon your blog, it’s terrific!

    I’m writing to inquire if I might be able to cite you in a report I’m doing for Queers for Economic Justice (q4ej.org). I’m doing a project that basically assesses Obama administration policy in terms of how it impacts queer folks, working-class folks, and people of color (and various intersecting versions of marginal modalities). I’m spending a whole section on “security”–talking about the new passport policy, the AIT system, etc. I’d love to use some quotes from your posts on your experiences to show how this is impacting the trans community. Can I have your permission to do this?

    I’d be happy to send you the final report before I send it to QEJ so you can approve what I write first.

    Thanks for your time, and I’m excited to keep reading….

    Raechel.. I’ll email you 🙂 thanks for reading

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